For accomodating me

Communication accommodation theory (CAT) is a theory of communication developed by Howard Giles.

It argues that, "When people interact they adjust their speech, their vocal patterns and their gestures, to accommodate to others." It explores the various reasons why individuals emphasize or minimize the social differences between themselves and their interlocutors through verbal and nonverbal communication.

This theory is concerned with the links between language, context, and identity.

The communication accommodation theory has broadened this theory to include not only speech but also the "non-verbal and discursive dimensions of social interaction." Like speech accommodation theory, communication accommodation theory continues to draw from social psychology, particularly from four main socio-psychology theories: similarity-attraction, social exchange, causal distribution and intergroup distinctiveness.

These theories help to explain why speakers seek to converge or diverge from the language, dialect, accent and behavior of their interlocutors. This latter theory argues that a person's self-concept comprises a personal identity and a social identity, and that this social identity is based in comparisons people make between in-groups (groups they belong to) and out-groups (groups they do not belong to).

According to social identity theory, people strive to maintain a positive social identity by either joining groups where they feel more comfortable or making a more positive experience of belonging to the groups they already belong to.

Since speech is a way to express group membership, people adopt convergence or divergence in communication to "signal a salient group distinctiveness, so as to reinforce a social identity." Communication accommodation thus, becomes a tool to emphasize group distinctiveness in a positive way, and strengthen the individual's social identity.

Four main socio-psychological theories: Similarity-attraction The similarity-attraction theory posits that, "The more similar our attitudes and beliefs are to those of others, the more likely it is for them to be attracted to us." An individual on the receiving end of high level of accommodation is likely to develop a greater sense of self-esteem and satisfaction than being a receiver of low accommodation.

Social exchange process The social exchange process theory "...states that prior to acting, we attempt to assess the rewards and costs of alternate courses of action," and that we tend to choose whatever course of action will bring greater rewards and less costs.

Although most often convergence can bring forth rewards, there are some occasions when it can also bring forth costs such as "increased effort to converge, a loss of perceived integrity and personal (and sometimes group) identity." Causal attribution process The causal attribution theory "Suggests that we interpret other people's behavior, and evaluate the individual themselves, in terms of the motivations and intentions that we attribute as the cause of their behavior" It applies to convergence in that convergence might be viewed positively or negatively depending on the causes we attribute to it: "Although interpersonal convergence is generally favorably received, and non-convergence generally unfavorably received, the extent to which this holds true will undoubtedly be influenced by the listeners attributions of the speaker's intent." Giles and Smith provide the example of an experiment that they conducted amongst French and English speaking Canadians to illustrate this.

In this experiment, when individuals believed that the person from the different group used language convergence to reduce cultural barriers, they evaluated it more positively than when they attributed it to the pressures of the situation.

"When French Canadian listeners attributed an English Canadian's convergence to French as due to his desire to break down cultural barriers, the shift was viewed favorably.

However, when this same behavior was attributed to pressures in the situation forcing the other to converge, positive feelings were not so strongly evoked." Intergroup distinctiveness The process of intergroup distinctiveness, as theorized by Tajfel argues, "..members of different groups are in contact, they compare themselves on dimensions that are important to them, such as personal attributes, abilities, material possessions and so forth." Because speech style and language is an important factor in defining social groups, divergence in speech style or language is often used to maintain intergroup distinctiveness and differentiate from the out-group, especially when group membership is a salient issue or the individual's identity and group membership is being threatened.

Many of the principles and concepts from social identity theory are also applicable to communication accommodation theory.

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