Teens camchat - Research papers dating and self esteem

PITTSBURGH/NEW YORK—Users of Facebook and other social networks should beware of allowing their self-esteem—boosted by “likes” or positive comments from close friends—to influence their behavior: It could reduce their self-control both on and offline, according to an academic paper by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Columbia Business School that has recently been published online in the . Online Social Networks, Self-Esteem, and Self-Control,” the research paper demonstrates that users who are focused on close friends tend to experience an increase in self-esteem while browsing their social networks; afterwards, these users display less self-control.Greater social network use among this category of users with strong ties to their friends is also associated with individuals having higher body-mass indexes and higher levels of credit-card debt, according to the paper.“To our knowledge, this is the first research to show that using online social networks can affect self-control,” said coauthor Andrew T.

Katz Graduate School of Business and College of Business Administration.

“We have demonstrated that using today’s most popular social network, Facebook, may have a detrimental affect on people’s self-control.” Stephen coauthored the research with Keith Wilcox, assistant professor of marketing at Columbia Business School. In the researchers’ initial study, participants completed surveys about how closely they’re connected to friends on Facebook.

The paper includes the results of five separate studies conducted with a total of more than 1,000 U. Then they were split into two groups: one group that wrote about the experience of browsing Facebook and another group that actually browsed Facebook. Regardless of whether the participants wrote about Facebook browsing or actually browsed the site, the participants with weak ties to Facebook friends did not experience an increase in self-esteem, but those with strong ties to friends had an enhanced sense of self-esteem.

Stephen and Wilcox’s second study evaluated why Facebook users with strong ties to friends were more likely to experience an increase in self-esteem.

Participants were prompted to browse Facebook for five minutes.

Some were told to pay attention to the status updates and other information people were sharing with them.

Others were directed to concentrate on information they were sharing.

The researchers concluded that browsing Facebook only increased participants’ self-esteem when they were focused on the information they were presenting to others.

“We find that people experience greater self-esteem when they focus on the image they are presenting to strong ties in their social networks,” said Wilcox.

Tags: , ,