Updating image linux

This article aims on providing information on flashing your system BIOS under Linux.

While the author of this article has successfully run this procedure many times, your mileage may vary. You may want to consider updating microcode instead if it is supported by your system. To use the biosdisk utility to create a BIOS flash image, first download the latest raw BIOS image for your system from your manufacturer's website.

Make sure however, that you always get the BIOS executable and NOT the Windows executable.

You then have one of several options: create a floppy, create a dd floppy image, create a user-installable distribution-specific package (e.g.

RPM), or actually install the image for your bootloader.

Flashromis a utility for identifying, reading, writing, verifying and erasing flash chips.

It is designed to flash BIOS/EFI/coreboot/firmware/option ROM images on mainboards, network/graphics/storage controller cards, and various programmer devices.

Warning: If you have a laptop/notebook/netbook, please do NOT try flashrom because interactions with the EC on these machines might crash your machine during flashing.

flashrom tries to detect if a machine is a laptop, but not all laptops follow the standard, so this is not 100% reliable.[1] package.

Find out if your motherboard and chipset (internal) is supported by flashrom at this website.

Supported Hardware You can also find out if your hardware is supported by issuing the following command Note: With Linux kernel versions greater than 4.4, CONFIG_IO_STRICT_DEVMEM a new kernel security measure can make flashrom stop working, in that case you can try adding "iomem=relaxed" to your kernel parameters. Free DOS a free DOS-compatible operating system, is up to the challenge, no need for proprietary DOS versions.

So, all you need is a bootable floppy disk image with Free DOS kernel on it.

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